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Home » Space News » The Great American Solar Eclipse Was A Hit
A graphic demonstrating how solar eclipses work. Image credit Tennessee State Parks
A graphic demonstrating how solar eclipses work. Image credit Tennessee State Parks

The Great American Solar Eclipse Was A Hit

Did you watch the total solar eclipse? If so, you were one of millions of people who traveled for the eclipse or were lucky enough to live in the path of totality. Many of these people saw a total solar eclipse for the first time ever because they were too young to remember the eclipse of 1979 made famous by Walter Cronkite’s coverage. Most were blown away by the experience of seeing what looked like a big hole in the sky for the first time ever.

Even some NFL teams seemed to catch Eclipse Fever. Carolina Panthers head coach Ron Rivera apparently couldn’t resist a little musical accompaniment:

Some people seemed interested in helping their furry friends watch the eclipse safely rather than going through the unnecessary step of confining them.

Who knows if those glasses would have actually protected the dog's eyes, but at least the owner tried. Image credit Yahoo
Who knows if those glasses would have actually protected the dog’s eyes, but at least the owner tried. Image credit Yahoo

A Nashville woman was able to help her disabled father watch the eclipse:

NASA’s live coverage of the event may have gotten overwhelmed by the number of visitors who couldn’t travel to the path of totality but wanted to follow the action anyway. However, services such as ViaSat helped to salvage the situation by providing reliable satellite broadband communications that were dedicated to relaying data and high-definition images of the corona taken by solar observations made during the Great American Solar Eclipse.

Unfortunately, many children were unable to see the eclipse because schools would not allow them to go outside during the event. The excuse was that schools did not want the liability if a child happened to look up at the sun without protection and suffered loss of vision. This means that schools missed an opportunity for STEM education purely because school administrator are scared to death of a lawsuit. However, some schools did allow an excused absence on that day so that children could watch the event with their families.

Notable figures in attendance included Bill Nye the Science Guy, who discussed the event for CBS on the day before the event:

Charlie Duke attended an event at the South Carolina State Museum in Columbia, but before that, he sneaked in for a segment for Fox News:

So the Great American Solar Eclipse of August 21, 2017, was mostly a success and was definitely a hit with those who were able to see it. If you were unable to see this event for whatever reason, or if you were completely hooked by this impressive solar eclipse, start planning now for the next eclipse on April 8, 2024. Don’t procrastinate, because hotels were often completely booked up months in advance as people snapped up rooms for the August 21st eclipse. NASA has an interactive Google Map that shows the best places to be for the upcoming eclipse in 2024.

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About Heidi Hecht

Heidi Hecht is a space geek, freelance content writer and owner of the Nothing in Particular Blog. She is also a published author with a new book, "Blockchain Space: How And Why Cryptocurrencies Fit Into The Space Age", now available on Amazon and Google Play.

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