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Home » Features » Articles » Science Museum, London, England

Science Museum, London, England

3/25/2015| Story by Ron Sparkman, Photography by Peggy Sparkman

 

Tucked away behind the Natural History Museum in London, is an unbelievable experience for all science enthusiasts, young and old. From the time you walk in the door, you’ll be instantly captivated. Admission is free, but they do ask for a donation. A £10.00 donation will also get you a copy of their Science Museum book– which is top notch–with a lot of great information on the museum’s history and what you can find inside. Walking toward the elevators, I could see an extremely large white circle that reminded me of Stargate. Even now, I don’t know exactly what it was, but it’s definitely an eye catcher. A little more on that later.DSC_0228

From the elevators, we took a trip to the third floor to grab some food and then start working our way down. For health-focused families, there’s a few fit and fun items available so as to keep your children away from the sugary snacks. We proceeded into a room boasting bountiful displays of aviation history, everything from hot air balloons, gliders, we then proceeded to check out one of the most amazing displays of flight history I’ve seen yet. Not a single piece of humankind’s work in the skies is passed up. Hot air balloons, gliders, and more…nothing is passed up. Check out the gallery and videos below to see some of the incredible work they’ve done in this presentation.

Now we come to the only part I found confusing. I didn’t realize there was a new wing added on to the complex, so I got a little lost trying to find this exhibition. I had to go to the third floor and walk to the building next door, then ride the elevator down to each floor. This area is home to the all too important “Atmosphere” exhibit, where innovative engineering and alternative energy are among the topics of discussion. A lot of riveting material can be seen in the video section, coming soon. Definitely educational and my only suggestion is that they need to find a way to drive more traffic to this important part of the  museum.

Out of breath and short on time, I got right down to business scoping out the treasure chest of space memorabilia in the museum. I took a short tour through the space part of the “Information Age”, which showcases all the technological advances we’ve seen over the years. Telephones, cable, fax, and so on. From their humble beginnings to their places in our everyday lives, the very basis of how we communicate with each other all across the world is brilliantly laid out here. There’s a little taste of the space program. But it’s nothing compared to the full-scale space exhibits.

Down another floor, I found myself taking in the “Cosmos and Culture” section. I felt like a kid in the candy story being around such a vast array of telescopic instruments that spanned the entire timeline of space viewing. Some of the mirrors used for the telescopes dwarfed me in size. Some truly inspiring craftsmen ship went into letting us stargazers see the light from far away galaxies.Finally, we arrived at the “Exploring Space” exhibit. In a word: incredible. Honestly, the only thing I can equate it to is what I saw when I was at NASA. And that’s a pretty impressive feat in itself. On display, is the entire gamut of space-related information, ranging from astronaut diapers to used spacecraft from important missions. The wall was a historical mural, a timeline adorned with stories of great inventors and scholars like Isaac Newton, as well as videos of our modern day space heroes, like the astronaut. Truly epic stuff.

 

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Finally, we arrived at the “Exploring Space” exhibit. In a word: incredible. Honestly, the only thing I can equate it to is what I saw when I was at NASA. And that’s a pretty impressive feat in itself. On display, is the entire gamut of space-related information, ranging from astronaut diapers to used spacecraft from important missions. The wall was a historical mural, a timeline adorned with stories of great inventors and scholars like Isaac Newton, as well as videos of our modern day space heroes, like the astronaut. Truly epic stuff.

In the gallery, you’ll find more photos of the other exhibits on display, as taken by site photographer (and bearer of me, Peggy Sparkman). She really took an interest in an exhibit she was passionate about, the evolution of phone communication and what it meant for society. But there’s so much more than that to look through. I truly hope you enjoy the videos and pictures. The Science Museum in London is definitely highly recommended from this “Astronut”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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